Posts Tagged ‘Indiana’

IDEM Proposes Revision Of Definition of Interference For Industrial Pretreatment Permits

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) has proposed a revision to State rules related to industrial pretreatment of wastewater. The pretreatment rules apply to industrial wastes being discharged to a Publically Owned Treatment Works, or POTW. The existing definition of “interference” in State rules is more stringent than the federal definition. IDEM is proposing to amend 327 IAC 5-17-11 to be consistent with 40 CFR 403.3(k).

Existing state rule at 327 IAC 5-17-11 defines “interference” as occurring if one of three listed conditions occurs at the POTW due to a discharge or discharges from other sources. The listed conditions include a discharge or discharges that:

  • inhibit or disrupt the POTW,
  • cause a violation of any of the POTW’s NPDES permit requirements, and
  • prevent the use of the POTW’s sewage sludge or its sludge disposal method.

The federal definition of “interference” ties the conditions and causing a violation of any requirement of the POTW’s NPDES permit together so that all have to occur before interference has occurred

The rule change was preliminarily adopted on 08/10/2016, however an effective date is yet to be determined

Approval of Changes To Indiana Hazardous Waste Management Requirements

Thursday, June 6th, 2013

US EPA has granted the State of Indiana final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Agency published a proposed authorization on October 9, 2012, and provided for public comment. EPA received no comments. The final authorization will be effective on June 6, 2013.

Some of the areas Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) modified its requirements for hazardous waste management include:

  • Burning of Hazardous Wastes in Boilers and Industrial Furnaces
  • Zinc Fertilizers Made From Recycled Hazardous Secondary Materials
  • Land Disposal Restrictions for Radioactively Contaminated Cadmium, Mercury, and Silver Containing Batteries
  • Recycled Used Oil Management Standards
  • Hazardous Waste – Non-wastewaters From Production of Dyes, Pigments and Food, Drug and Cosmetic Colorants;
  • Standardized Permit for RCRA Hazardous Waste Management Facilities,
  • Revision of Wastewater Treatment Exemptions for Hazardous Waste Mixtures,
  • Modifications to NESHAP: Final Standards for Hazardous Waste Combustors and for Surface Coating of Automobiles and Light-Duty Trucks

States which have received final authorization from EPA under RCRA must maintain a hazardous waste program that is equivalent to, consistent with, and no less stringent than the Federal program. Indiana has enforcement responsibilities under its state hazardous waste program for RCRA violations, but EPA retains its authority under RCRA to:

  1. Do inspections, and require monitoring, tests, analyses, or reports;
  2. enforce RCRA requirements and suspend or revoke permits; and
  3. take enforcement actions regardless of whether the state has taken its own actions.

Updated Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Action Plan Public Comment Meetings

Wednesday, May 15th, 2013

The Great Lakes Interagency Task Force has scheduled meetings for the public to provide input to a planned update of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Action Plan.

The updated Action Plan would direct Great Lakes restoration for fiscal years 2015-2019. The public may comment directly to the federal agencies and to the Great Lakes Advisory Board (GLAB), a panel of experts established to provide recommendations to the federal agencies. Comments may be given at any of the following scheduled meetings:

•May 21-22 – Great Lakes Advisory Board Inaugural Meeting & Public Comment to GLAB
•May 23 – Webinar
•May 28 – Buffalo, New York.
•May 30 – Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
•June 3 – Webinar
•June 5 – Cleveland, Ohio.

In February 2010, the Task Force released the GLRI Action Plan for FY2010-2014. The Action Plan identified goals, objectives, measurable ecological targets, and specific actions to help rehabilitate the Great Lakes. The Action Plan targets investments to reduce toxic contamination, rehabilitate fish and wildlife habitat, improve nearshore health, reduce nutrients and other land-based pollution, prevent invasive species, and promote accountability, education, and collaboration.

SWPPP Program Development and Qualified Environmental Professional SWPPP Certification

Tuesday, March 26th, 2013

Caltha LLP Project Summary

Project: Industrial Storm Water Permitting, SWPPP Certification & Compliance
Client: ISO 14001 Registered Manufacturer
Location(s): Indiana

Key Elements: SWPPP preparation, Stormwater monitoring, Compliance plan, SWPPP certification by qualified environmental professional

Overview: Caltha LLP has provided consulting services to this ISO 14001 manufacturer to meet the Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) industrial storm water rules, also known as “Rule  6”. Services included preparing facility stormwater pollution prevention plan using Caltha’s Indiana SWPPP template, preparation of site-specific inspection checklists to comply with State inspection requirements, preparation of site-specific stormwater monitoring plan to meet State requirements applicable to this industrial sector. Caltha then provided SWPPP certification, as required under Indiana Rule 6; in Indiana all permittees must submit a SWPPP checklist to IDEM within 6 months of initial permit coverage. This checklist must be certified by a qualified Environmental Professional, attesting that the SWPPP was prepared in accordance with IDEM requirements. Because the operation is ISO 14001 registered, all documents were prepared to conform to the facilities document control systems. Caltha then provided ad hoc technical support to facilities to address questions during roll-out of the compliance programs.

For more information on Caltha LLP SWPPP services, go to the Environmental Health & Safety Plan | Spill Plan Information Request Form.

Temporary Corporate HSE Staffing – Site Remediation Oversight

Friday, March 22nd, 2013

Caltha LLP Project Summary

Project: Corporate HSE Staffing-Site Remediation Oversight
Client: Multi-national Chemical Company
Location(s): California, Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, North Carolina, Ontario, Canada, Michigan, Kentucky, Arizona

Key Elements: Environmental Health & Safety Staffing, Site remediation

Overview: This chemical company contracted with Caltha to provide temporary staffing in its corporate HSE Department for the position that oversaw numerous site remediation projects being conducted across the US and Canada. Due to staff turnover the position needed to be filled quickly to assure that process on projects continued, on-site contractors had questions and issues addressed, and that required agency submittals were reviewed, approved and submitted on time. Caltha provided a highly experienced HSE professional to fill the position until the corporation could hire a permanent replacement. Caltha staff were then able to provide transitional support.

For more information on Caltha LLP services, go to the Caltha Contact Page

Logistics Industrial Storm Water Permitting & Compliance

Wednesday, March 20th, 2013

Caltha LLP Project Summary

Project: Industrial Storm Water Permitting & Compliance
Client: International Retailer
Location(s): California, Washington, Utah, Georgia, Florida, Virginia, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Massachusetts, New York, Kansas, Virginia, Louisiana, Texas, Tennessee, Minnesota, Illinois, Indiana, South Carolina, Colorado, Nevada, New Jersey, Connecticut, Missouri

Key Elements: SWPPP preparation, Stormwater monitoring, Compliance plan, Permit application

Overview: Caltha LLP has provided consulting services to this international retailer at multiple logistics and warehousing locations to comply with individual State industrial stormwater rules. Services included preparing facility stormwater pollution prevention plans, preparation of State or EPA application forms (Notice of Intent), preparation of site-specific inspection checklists to comply with individual State inspection requirements, preparation of site-specific stormwater monitoring and benchmark monitoring plans to meet State requirements applicable to this industrial sector. Caltha then provided ad hoc technical support to facilities to address questions during roll-out of the compliance programs.

For more information on Caltha LLP SWPPP services, go to the Environmental Health & Safety Plan | Spill Plan Information Request Form.

SWPPP and SWP3 Certification – What Is Certified, What States Require Certifications and Who Needs To Sign?

Thursday, March 7th, 2013

Under State and EPA stormwater permitting rules, a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) may need to be certified. This signed SWPPP Certification is in addition to other types of certifications that may be required. The types of certifications will vary depending on the State and type of permit; in addition to SWPPP Certification, some other types of certifications might include:

  • Non-stormwater Discharge Certification,
  • No-exposure Monitoring Exemption Certification;
  • Heavy Metal No-exposure Certification (in Texas);
  • Annual Site Compliance Certifications;
  • Endangered Species Certifications;
  • Historic Places Certification,
  • Environemental Professional Certifiaction (in Indiana)
  • Certified Stormwater Operator Certifiacxtion (in Michigan)
  • Others.

SWPPP Certification – What is Being Certified?

In most cases, the SWPPP Certification statement indicates that the SWPPP has been 1) prepared; 2) implemented and that 3) the SWPPP conforms to the requirements of the discharge permit. The SWPPP Certification generally includes a statement that the information documented is correct. The exact wording and scope of the certification statement will vary from State-to-State, but here is an example:

“I certify under penalty of law that this document and all attachments were prepared under my direction or supervision in accordance with a system designed to ensure that qualified personnel properly gather and evaluate the information submitted. Based on my inquiry of the person or persons who manage the system, or those persons directly responsible for gathering the information, the information submitted is to the best of my knowledge and belief, true, accurate, and complete. I am aware that there are significant penalties for submitting false information, including the possibility of fine and imprisonment for knowing violations.”
Who needs to certify the SWPPP?

In some States (for example, Michigan, Indiana, Connecticut and others), the SWPPP needs to be signed by a certified or qualified environmental professional.

In most States, the SWPPP also needs to be signed by a Responsible Company Officer, or his/her duly authorized representative. State or EPA rules will determine who can sign the SWPPP. This SWPPP Certification can be in addition to any certifications needed by a qualified environmental professional.

For more information on Caltha LLP SWPPP services, go to the Environmental Health & Safety Plan | Spill Plan Information Request Form.

IDEM Amended Rules For General Stormwater Discharge Permit

Monday, February 18th, 2013

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) has announced it will add new rules, amend rules and repeal rules in 329 IAC 5 and 327 IAC 15 concerning National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) general permits governed by 40 CFR 122. These rules are for General Permits from runoff of Stormwater from Construction Activities. This action is to correct deficiencies in Indiana’s general permit program identified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

The rules are due for final adoption June 1, 2013 and anticipated to be in effect on October 1, 2013

Indiana Rule 6 SWP3 Template and Storm Water Certification By Qualified Professional

Wednesday, December 19th, 2012

In Indiana, industrial stormwater discharges are permitted through Rule 6, which is similar to general permits used by other States, and includes many of the same compliance requirements including preparation of a facility stormwater pollution prevention plan, or SWP3. One of the unique aspects of the Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) requirements is that a facility submits a SWP3 checklist within one year of Rule 6 coverage. This checklist must be signed by an qualified professional and certifies that the SWP3 meet all applicable requirements and the facility is in compliance with Rule 6.

What is an Qualified Professional under Rule 6? The SWP3 Checklist must be certified by a “qualified professional” who is a person “trained and experienced in storm water treatment techniques and related fields as may be demonstrated by state registration, professional certification, experience, or completion of coursework that enable the individual to make sound, professional judgments regarding storm water control or treatment and monitoring, pollutant fate and transport, and drainage planning.”

To reduce the level of effort required for facilities to come into compliance with Rule 6 requirements, Caltha LLP has prepared a SWPPP template based on Indiana requirements, including Indiana specific inspection checklist, visual assessment checklist,  comprehensive storm water monitoring plan, and an annual comprehensive site inspection checklist. Caltha has also prepared a Indiana Stormwater Permit Compliance Plan to assist permitted facilities in organizing and planning compliance requirements under the IDEM Rule 6.

Caltha provides certification of facility SWP3 by a qualified professional meeting the Rule 6 qualification requirements.

For more information on the Indiana industrial SWPPP template, compliance plan and expert SWPPP consulting services, email Caltha at info@calthacompany.com

What Are Great Lakes Water Quality Wildlife Criterion and How Are They Calculated?

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012

The Water Quality Guidance for the Great Lakes System, also known as the Great Lake Initiative or GLI (40 CFR 132), created a few new types of water quality standards intended to be applied to waters in the Great Lakes basin.

A Great Lakes Water Quality Wildlife Criterion (GLWC) is intended to protect avian (bird) and mammalian wildlife populations in the Great Lakes basin from adverse effects resulting from the ingestion of water and aquatic prey taken from surface waters of the Great Lakes. These criteria are based on existing toxicological studies  and information about the exposure of wildlife species to the substance (i.e., food and water consumption rates).

Since toxicological and exposure data for individual wildlife species are very limited, a GLWC was calculated using a similar methodology to that used to derive noncancer human health criteria. Separate avian and mammalian values are developed using toxicity and exposure data for representative Great Lakes basin wildlife species.

Five wildlife species were selected to be representative of bird and animal species living in the Great Lakes basin which are likely to experience the highest exposures to bioaccumulative contaminants through the aquatic food web:

  • bald eagle,
  • herring gull,
  • belted kingfisher,
  • mink, and
  • river otter.